Smoking kills 1 in 2
#DontBeThe1

It's a tragic fact that one in every two long-term smokers will die early from a smoking-related illness, some in their 40s. How will your family cope if you're one of them? But it's never too late to quit. Take the first step for you or someone you love today!

Take the

First step

Stopping smoking brings health benefits at any age and there's never been so many ways to quit. Make a fresh start today.

Local NHS
Stop Smoking Services

You're much more likely to quit for good friendly support from your local NHS Stop Smoking Service

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Join millions who have used free tools from Smokefree to help quit. Sign up today for the quitting app, quit kit, email or text support.

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Why you should quit. The facts.

Most smokers underestimate the risks, but every cigarette brings cancer and a range of other diseases closer.

Click on a body part to see how smoking affects everyone in your family.

Ear

Smokers are more likely to suffer from hearing loss than non-smokers. Children are affected too - being exposed to secondhand smoke increases the risk of hearing loss among children and teens.

Quit today

Brain

Smoking can cause a stroke where the brain's blood supply is cut off. More than half of all stroke survivors are left dependent on others for everyday activities. Smoking also puts you at greater risk of dementia due to problems in blood vessels supplying the brain.

Quit today

Lungs

Every cigarette damages air sacs, making smokers breathless and increasing the risks of emphysema where sufferers feel like they're suffocating. Cigarette smoke is full of cancer causing chemicals like arsenic and tar. As a result, lung cancer is the most common form of cancer caused by smoking.

The earlier you quit, the smaller your risk of dying from lung cancer.

Quit today

Aged Skin

Smoking reduces blood flow to the skin and can damage tissues such as collagen and elastin, causing skin to appear wrinkled and aged. It's also linked to a range of skin problems, such as psoriasis.

Quit today

Cot death

Smoking during pregnancy and exposing the child to second hand smoke in its first year of life is a risk factor for cot death or SID (sudden infant death syndrome).

Quit today

Child's lungs

Because children have smaller, more delicate lungs, which are still developing, it's more dangerous for children to breathe in second hand smoke. Children of smokers also have higher rates of asthma, bronchitis and pneumonia than the children of non-smokers.

Quit today

 

Child's ears

Children of smokers are more likely to contract 'glue ear' (a swelling of the ear) which can cause hearing loss and may lead to speech problems.

Quit today

Heart and Blood

Smokers are at greater risk of sudden cardiac death than non-smokers. Smoking raises the heart rate and blood pressure, while at the same time reducing the ability of blood to carry oxygen. Smoking also causes a build up of dangerous fatty deposits around the walls of blood vessels making it harder for blood to travel around the body.

Quit today

Muscles and bones

Smoking gradually decreases your bone density over the course of your life and makes you more likely to have fractures.

Quit today

 

Stomach

As well as increasing your risk of Crohns disease (a chronic inflammatory bowl condition) and increasing acidity in your stomach and gut, smoking causes cancer of the stomach, pancreas and bowel.

Quit today

Bladder

Both men and women who smoke are more likely to develop bladder cancer. Men are also more likely to suffer from problems with getting or maintaining an erection.

Quit today

Legs, arms and fingers

Smoking can cause a build up of fatty deposits around the walls of blood vessels, making it more difficult for the heart to pump blood to hands and feet.

In serious cases, this can lead to peripheral vascular disease (PVD) and can result in severe pain. It can also lead to gangrene and amputation. Quitting reduces your risk of developing PVD, compared to a continuing smoker.

Quit today

Eyes

Smoking causes more than one in four cases of macular degeneration (an eye condition that leads to loss of vision). Clouding of the eye lens also occurs in smokers 10 to 15 years earlier than in non-smokers.

Quit today

Nose

Smoking causes cancer of the nose and sinuses. It also affects your ability to smell. Once you quit, your sense of smell will improve.

Quit today

Cancer

Smoking is by far the biggest preventable cause of cancer in the world, causing cancer all over the body, including the lungs, mouth, voice box, upper throat, nose and sinuses, oesophagus, liver, pancreas, stomach, kidney, bladder, cervix and bowel, as well as one type of ovarian cancer and some types of leukaemia.

Quit today

Heart and Blood

Smokers are at greater risk of sudden cardiac death than non-smokers. Smoking raises the heart rate and blood pressure, while at the same time reducing the ability of blood to carry oxygen. Smoking also causes a build up of dangerous fatty deposits around the walls of blood vessels making it harder for blood to travel around the body.

Quit today

Breast Feeding

Some of the nicotine and other poisons in cigarettes are passed from a mother who smokes to the baby through breast milk.

However, it's better than not breastfeeding at all so if you are having trouble quitting, don't smoke just before or during feeds.

Quit today

 

Cancer

Smoking is by far the biggest preventable cause of cancer in the world, causing cancer all over the body, including the lungs, mouth, voice box, upper throat, nose and sinuses, oesophagus, liver, pancreas, stomach, kidney, bladder, cervix and bowel, as well as one type of ovarian cancer and some types of leukaemia.

Quit today

Diabetes

Smoking can cause type 2 diabetes, and amongst diabetics increases the risk of serious complications like heart disease, stroke and circulation problems.

Quit today

Mouth

Smoking is a major cause of cancers to the neck, mouth, tongue and throat. Surgery may involve removing part of the palate, tongue, or jaw. But quitting halves the risk of mouth and throat cancer within five years.

Smoking also reduces the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to the gums, making smokers' gums more susceptible to infection and tooth loss.

Quit today

Women's health

Female smokers have a list of additional
problems that can include:
  • An increased risk of heart attack and stroke if you smoke and take the pill
  • Difficulty becoming pregnant
  • Missed and more painful periods
  • An increased risk of cancer of the cervix and ovary
  • A loss of bone density in older women, and an increased risk of hip fractures
  • Early menopause

Quit today

Diabetes Smoking is a risk factor for diabetes, and amongst diabetics increases the risk of complications like heart disease, stroke and circulation problems.

Brain: Smoking can cause a stroke where the brain's blood supply is cut off. More than half of all stroke survivors are left dependent on others for everyday activities. Smoking doubles the risk of stroke.

Ears: Smokers are more likely to suffer from hearing loss than non-smokers. Children are affected too - being exposed to secondhand smoke increases the risk of hearing loss among children and teens

Lungs: Every cigarette damages air sacs, making smokers breathless and increasing the risks of COPD where sufferers feel like they're suffocating. Lung cancer is also the most common form of cancer caused by smoking.

Cancer: Smoking is by far the biggest preventable cause of cancer in the world, causing over a dozen types of cancer all over the body, including the stomach, pancreas and bowel, nose and sinuses.

Eyes: Smoking causes more than one in four cases of macular degeneration (an eye condition that leads to loss of vision).

Mouth: Smoking is a major cause of cancers to the neck, mouth, tongue and throat. Surgery may involve removing part of the palate, tongue, or jaw.

Heart and Blood: Smokers have two to three times the risk of suffering sudden cardiac death than non-smokers. Smoking causes a build-up of dangerous fatty deposits around the walls of blood vessels making it harder for blood to travel around the body.

Legs, arms and fingers: Smoking can cause a build-up of fatty deposits around the walls of blood vessels, making it more difficult for the heart to pump blood to hands and feet.  In serious cases, this can lead to peripheral vascular disease (PVD) and can result in severe pain, or gangrene and amputation.

Skin: smoking ages the skin the more you smoke, the greater your risk of developing wrinkles.

Women
Female smokers who take the pill are at greater risk of heart attack and stroke. Women smokers also face higher risks of cervical and ovarian cancer, missed and more painful periods, and early menopause.

Children
Children who breathe in secondhand smoke are more likely to suffer from asthma, bronchitis as well as 'glue ear' (a swelling of the ear) which can cause hearing loss and can lead to speech problems. Smoke can also increase the risks of cot death.

Here are some other benefits to quitting:

Nearly three quarters of children worry that their mum or dad will die because of their smoking. So if you don't quit for your health, do it for your loved ones.

  • You won't smell of smoke.
  • Your skin and teeth will improve.
  • You'll improve your general fitness.
  • You'll save thousands of pounds. Think of what you could spend the money on. A family holiday, perhaps?

For more reasons to quit click here

#Dontbethe1

Help to quit

If you want to quit, you're up to four times more likely to succeed with NHS support. Pop into your local pharmacy, ask at your GP, or call:

County Durham NHS Stop Smoking Service

0800 011 3405

Darlington NHS Stop Smoking Service

0300 123 1044 (national quitline only)

Gateshead - Live Well Gateshead

0800 0149092

Middlesbrough, Redcar and Cleveland NHS Stop Smoking Service

01642 383819

Newcastle NHS Stop Smoking Service

0191 2292911

North Tyneside Stop Smoking Service

call 0345 2000 101 and say ‘NO SMOKE’

Northumberland NHS Stop Smoking Service

01670 813135

South Tyneside – Change4Life South Tyneside

Stockton and Hartlepool NHS Stop Smoking Service

01642 383819

Sunderland Stop Smoking Service

0800 107 0741

Free online quitting tools

Join millions who have used free tools from Smokefree to help quit. Sign up today for the quitting app, quit kit, email or text support.

Sign up now
 

Ask a loved one to quit

If you care about someone, it's only natural you might worry about them smoking. And many people who stop say it was their child or partner who gave them the willpower to quit. Let someone you care about know you don't want them to be the one with a personalised email message. It could make the difference they need.

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© Fresh - Smoke Free North East 2012

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